ownCloud unable to add new users – A user with that name already exists.

Using owncloud 8.2, when adding a new user it can error saying that the user already exists, regardless what username you put in.

owncloud user already exists

This turned out to be a problem with an App called “User backend using remote HTTP servers”, disabling this resolved this error for me.

If you are using the standard ownCloud authentication method then this App should not need to be enabled.

Growing the root filesystem on Arch Linux ARM for the Raspberry Pi

Changes to the partition layout in the July 2013 image invalidate the information in this post, please see the comment section for details.

I run Arch Linux on my Raspberry Pi, this defaults to creating a 2GB partition for it’s data which I needed to extend to access the remaining space on my 16GB SD card. I’ll explain how I did this below but only do this on a newly installed Arch installation so if anything goes wrong you do not lose any data.

To start I’m assuming you’ve installed Arch on your SD card, if you haven’t follow this guide to show you how.

Boot Arch on your Raspberry Pi, log in as root on the console or via SSH, either way works fine. To start we will remove the partition containing Arch and replace it with another partition starting in the same location but ending at the end of the SD Card, this will vary depending on the size of the card you have.

[root@alarmpi ~]# fdisk /dev/mmcblk0

In fdisk,

  1. Press ‘p’ to print the partition table, take note of the number in the Start column of the row starting ‘/dev/mmcblk0p2’
  2. Press ‘d’ to delete a partition then enter ‘2’ to choose the second partition
  3. Press ‘n’ to create a new partition, all the default options are fine:
  • Choose ‘primary’ partition type
  • Partition number 2
  • The starting block should be same number you took note of in step 1
  • The default ending block should be the last available block on the SD card, this will vary depending on what size SD card you have

4. Press ‘w’ to write the new partition table and return to the bash prompt

Reboot now to force the kernel to recognise the new partition table.

[root@alarmpi ~]# reboot

After reboot we now we have the same two partitions we started with except that the second partition containing the root filesystem is now larger. However, the root filesystem is still only 2GB so we now need to resize the filesystem in order to fill the partition.

[root@alarmpi ~]# resize2fs /dev/mmcblk0p2

And there you go, you can now run ‘df -h’ to view your new partition sizes! Here’s mine…

[root@alarmpi ~]# df -h
Filesystem      Size  Used Avail Use% Mounted on
/dev/root        15G  457M   14G   4% /
devtmpfs         51M     0   51M   0% /dev
tmpfs           105M     0  105M   0% /dev/shm
tmpfs           105M  260K  105M   1% /run
tmpfs           105M     0  105M   0% /sys/fs/cgroup
tmpfs           105M     0  105M   0% /tmp
/dev/mmcblk0p1   90M   24M   67M  27% /boot

GTK theming QT apps

It’s becoming more common to run a mixture of apps using the QT toolkit (as seen in the KDE desktop) and the GTK toolkit (as seen in GNOME desktop). When using a GTK-based desktop, QT apps may appear out of place by not following the GTK theme settings, this can be fixed using ‘qtconfig’ as follows:

From a console run:

qtconfig qt4

From the graphical menu pull down the “Select GUI style” option and select “GTK+”. Click ‘file’ then ‘save’ and any running QT apps should instantly re-theme and look a lot better!

If ‘qtconfig’ is not installed, it can be installed on apt-based systems by entering:

sudo apt-get install qt4-qtconfig